Head & manifold porting schools

Have an interesting technique, tool or just anything related to porting? Post it here . . . please no bashing anyone for the model of engine they are working, we're here to share ideas . . .

Postby Mousehouse1 » Tue Dec 27, 2005 12:31 pm

I am wanting to learn more about porting heads and manifolds and wondered if there is any good schools to attend or where can I learn more about porting heads and manifolds?

I talked to Joe Mondello and his one week school runs $3500 which includes everything you will need for a weeks stay. But is it worth it?
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Postby Shawn » Tue Dec 27, 2005 9:42 pm

I guess what you'd have to determine is what your time is worth. Are you planning on doing this for a living? On the side for some friends? If so at $350 a set you pay for your schooling in 10 sets. Not many colleges you can go to that would let you earn enough to pay for them in 10-20 days worth of work. What you will learn there will shave years off of what it would take to learn on your own. Another "school" to look at -
http://www.rehermorrison.com/
It isn't centered around just cylinder heads, (although i think they're looking at one of those classes), it will give you an entire look at building a combonation. This is something that is critical when your trying to develope a cylinder head for a specific application.Is this what your looking for?
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Postby Mousehouse1 » Tue Dec 27, 2005 10:14 pm

I would like to get into manifold porting but would do cylinder heads as well. I just don't want to waste money that could be spent elsewhere. I am not going to do it full time but on the side. I would like to be able to work on my own stuff and others once my skill level was good enough.

Just would like to have more of an idea of what I am doing and how to make intakes and cylinder heads work better. Most of the guys around here get $500-$1000 to fully port a set of heads depending on if they are small block or big block.
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Postby Nick » Wed Dec 28, 2005 12:20 am

I'm in the same boat as you. $3500 is a lot of money. One thing I do think is it gives you a sales pitch. You've been trained by one of the best printers in the industry. I would like to go to Reher Morrison school, personally. But then on the other side, you could just learn as you go. There's no free lunch in this world, well maybe here on Bruce's site. This site has to be an exception to the rule. There is a ton of good info here. Where else can you learn how to build a flow bench?

Anyone have the speed talk Cd's? I think they are 100 bucks.

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Postby Rick360 » Wed Dec 28, 2005 1:56 am

Anyone have the speed talk Cd's? I think they are 100 bucks.

I didn't buy the set, I bought a bunch of different ones. I do have most of the ones in the airflow set. Some very interesting info. Ones I would recommend : Darin Morgan, Phil Martin, Harold Bettes, Jim McFarland.

One interview in particular I didn't like much was Mondello. I also wouldn't go to his school.

I am wanting to learn more about porting heads and manifolds and wondered if there is any good schools to attend or where can I learn more about porting heads and manifolds?


Study as many sets of heads as you can find, especially heads from know head porting shops. Flow them, measure them, look at them from every angle.

As far as manifolds, runner CSA, smooth turn into the head port and runner entry radius are the main things. Practice with the grinder making the shape you want at the end of a 6" or 8" burr attached to a grinder takes more than a weeks class. It takes lots of practice, nothing can replace that.

I am no professional or expert porter (I do it only for good friends ). I started by doing my own heads and manifolds. Then I'd sell them to someone who liked how my car ran. I'd buy another set and do them. After you've done a few of your own and they run good, you won't have any trouble getting people to pay you to grind on their heads or manifold. Start out slowly and do the basic port match and cleanup. Working into the more involved serious efforts.

Manifolds take far more time than you think they will to do a full porting job on one.

Rick
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Postby gofaster » Wed Dec 28, 2005 11:14 am

I am a graduate of Joe Mondello's school, and it was worth it and then some. I had to unlearn a lot of what I thought I knew, and it was a real eye opener. I thought I knew my s--t when I went there and would just round out my knowledge and technique. I found out I had some important things to learn once the class got started.

If you don't plan to make a living doing this work, you may not want to spend the time or money and just continue learning by trial and error. If you want to get up to speed and make a living, then the courses are well worth it.

The class has chalkboard time, and lot's of hands on. You'll port heads (which the school supplies) shoulder to shoulder with Joe, and you'll do it until you're arms are ready to fall off! Joe won't let anything slide and you WILL know how to set up and port a head when you're done.

After class is out, it isn't over. Joe's door is always open for you. Any time I've had a question he's answered it, even if it meant calling me back from the road on his cell phone.

I guess it depends on what you want and what you want to do with it.
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