porting plates

Have an interesting technique, tool or just anything related to porting? Post it here . . . please no bashing anyone for the model of engine they are working, we're here to share ideas . . .

Postby Jason » Thu Sep 25, 2008 4:15 pm

Hey guys, I'm just getting into porting and I had a couple of questions. Would it help if porting plates were bolted to a part and torqued down before porting? I guess you would call them porting plates, kind of how a deck plate is used when boring a block to simulate the cylinder head bolted in place. Has anyone tried this, or does anyone think it would be completely unnecessary?
1997 Ford F150 4x2, 4.2L V6, 5 spd, 3.55 limited slip rear, stock with gasket matched and mildy ported upper and lower intakes
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Postby 86rocco1 » Thu Sep 25, 2008 5:18 pm

Not necessary. A deck plate is required when boring a block because of the high level of precision that's required. That level of precision simply isn't required for porting and unless you're porting with a cnc machine, would be impossible to achieve.
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Postby Jason » Thu Sep 25, 2008 9:05 pm

OK, I just didn't know if it would help or not, thanks for the reply. I'm trying to learn as much as possible, so I'll probably have a lot of dumb questions :D
1997 Ford F150 4x2, 4.2L V6, 5 spd, 3.55 limited slip rear, stock with gasket matched and mildy ported upper and lower intakes
Jason
 
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Location: Versailles, KY

Postby 86rocco1 » Thu Sep 25, 2008 10:40 pm

Jason wrote:I'm trying to learn as much as possible, so I'll probably have a lot of dumb questions :D

We like questions, even so called "dumb" ones, they make us think, keep us on our toes.
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Postby bruce » Fri Sep 26, 2008 7:34 am

I think this might be application dependent, I had a Tecumseh OHV single cylinder engine for one of my tractors that needed a torque plate installed when I machined the seats. If I machined the seats without the torque plate I could never get the seats to seal once it was installed on the block.

This was before I had a flowbench, would it be a problem flowing without the torque plate? Probably not for the level of flow I look at, but it was a problem once the head was installed on the block. You have to look at your own testing practices and the level you need or want to take your flow to. Are you going to be looking for .5cfm or 1cfm? Personally in my level of testing on my own parts I'm looking for changes at 1-2 cfm and then it's more about flow quality with the velocity probe. The velocity probe has added another tool to use on the bench.

As your testing/knowledge improves you can up your level, as the old saying goes; walk before you run . . .
"There is no more formidable adversary than one who perceives he has nothing to lose." - Gen. George S. Patton
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Postby Jason » Fri Sep 26, 2008 8:58 am

bruce wrote:You have to look at your own testing practices and the level you need or want to take your flow to. Are you going to be looking for .5cfm or 1cfm? Personally in my level of testing on my own parts I'm looking for changes at 1-2 cfm and then it's more about flow quality with the velocity probe. The velocity probe has added another tool to use on the bench.

It's not something I was gonna try right away, it was more of an idea that I had while I was at work. I have a couple of friends who pull diesel trucks, one of them in the Super Street class making 700-800hp. He said once I get a bench made, he'll buy another stock intake manifold and let me see what I can do with it. I just thought something running a lot of boost like that (I think like 60-70psi) would put a lot of strain on the manifold and possibly cause some deflection. I don't know, I know some other Duramax guys, so if I can get a couple of manifolds I might try it on one to see if it makes a difference. That will probably be next spring or so, because I want to make sure to learn quite a bit before building a bench. Thank you all for the responses.
1997 Ford F150 4x2, 4.2L V6, 5 spd, 3.55 limited slip rear, stock with gasket matched and mildy ported upper and lower intakes
Jason
 
Posts: 13
Joined: Sat Sep 20, 2008 12:59 pm
Location: Versailles, KY

Postby larrycavan » Sun Sep 28, 2008 6:23 pm

Jason,

In case you haven't found this one yet

Porting Basics on PHR
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Postby Jason » Mon Sep 29, 2008 4:42 pm

larrycavan wrote:Jason,

In case you haven't found this one yet

Porting Basics on PHR

Thanks Larry, I'll read it later when I get done with my truck :D
1997 Ford F150 4x2, 4.2L V6, 5 spd, 3.55 limited slip rear, stock with gasket matched and mildy ported upper and lower intakes
Jason
 
Posts: 13
Joined: Sat Sep 20, 2008 12:59 pm
Location: Versailles, KY


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